Kromski The Harp

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Kromski The Harp

from 199.00

The Harp Loom

Perhaps the most popular rigid heddle loom in North America. If you are new to weaving, proceed with confidence as the Harp will prepare you for a lifetime of weaving – what you learn on a Harp all carries forward to a larger loom. Size, price point and the Harp package of accessories make it a perfect loom. Folds with your project on it for easy transportation. Stand, tote bag and extra heddles also available.

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 A warping board is integral the Harp’s design: turn over the loom and you can make your warp (five yards plus). With other looms the warping board is purchased separately, which could set you back about $70, with the Harp it is part of your package.

 

Harp as a Warping Board

• The Harp folds, with warp attached, and fits neatly into the Kromski tote bag. Perfect for traveling and storing in small spaces.

• The Kromski Harp is turned of European Alder wood and coated in a clear finish for a beautifully striking look. Don’t compare prices with an unfinished product, many other rigid heddle looms lack a finish or charge additional for one and you want a finish on the wood for long term protection.

• Your Harp comes with a 8-dent heddle, two stick shuttles, a pick-up stick, threading hook, two clamps, a warping peg, warping board pegs and the very helpful “Warp Helper”. Just add the yarn. With the Kromski Harp

 

Harp Folded

you get the complete package. Perfect for beginners, the harp provides everything a weaving student would need.

• Options: Kromski Tote, extra heddles, heddle blocks (for using two heddles for more complex weaving) and floor stand. Three sizes: 16″, 24″ and 32″ for versatility.

What Size Harp Should I select?

Loom Width – How Important Is It?

You can always weave a project that is less than your maximum loom width, but you cannot weave wider (there is an exception, but we will not go there now as it does not pertain to a rigid heddle loom).

• What do you want to weave? If you know, then weaving width selection will follow. Belts, runners, place mats, dish towels, scarves and similar projects will work well on a 16″ Harp.

• If you want to make fabric for clothing, attempting fabric on a smaller loom will limit you, so you will want either a 24″ or a 32″ Harp.

• Is a 32″ loom too large? Will it be difficult to hold and to work the shuttles back and forth? Holding a Harp in the traditional fashion – front beam on your lap and the back raked up to a table edge – will not be a problem for anyone of any size, even children. As for throwing the shuttles, you should not find this a problem. Think about the distance of 16″ (half of the 32″) measured out from the centerline of your body to your elbows. The loom will be sitting comfortably inside this area, giving you an easy reach left and right to use your shuttles.

• Prices are slightly higher for the wider looms, but the $21-$25 difference equates to more versatility in the long run.

• The Harp does not take up much space regardless of its width. Open, it can be moved into a closet or under a bed. Folded, it takes up even less room.

View the printed assembly instructions and instructions for using the Kromski Harp

* Please Note: The Kromskis Harp in the 24″ and 32″ size do not have an arched heddle. The wood is straight. Pictures shown here may show a 16″ heddle, which does have an arch.

The Harp comes in a boxed kit and requires assembly. Watch the videos below on how to assemble or download an Instructional PDF .

Should I also purchase a loom stand?

Without a stand, the weaver sits with the front beam on her lap and the back end of the loom angled up against a table edge or workbench. This gives you a good view of what is being done and allows the light weight of the loom to be backstopped by your body weight as the beating is done.  This is the traditional way to hold and work this type of loom.

But what if you don’t have a suitable table or counter in the room where you want to weave? What if you want to weave on the back porch one day, under the tree in the backyard tomorrow, upstairs next week and so on? What if you want the convenience of just standing up and walking away from the loom when the phone rings? Now you see some of the advantages of a loom stand. And there are more:

• the Kromski stand allows you to set the angle of the loom (it is adjustable);
• the stand can hold your loom when you use the warping board which is on the back of the loom;
• the stand stores the warping pegs if you don’t want to keep them on the back of the loom;
• the pegs can create handy shelves on each side of the stand to hold stick shuttles or balls of yarn.

So, do you need a stand? Picture yourself weaving. If a stand is in the picture then get one.